Ratio and Proportion

Posted in Design Technology, History, Maths

We made scale models in groups of the Parthenon. We researched the original measurements and using what we know in maths about ration and proportion built scale models.  We wrote our own blog posts about the process of designing, making and calculating and how we overcame any problems.

Parthenon

Posted in Design Technology, History, Maths

Together we achieved our scale model of the Parthenon by communicating, working together and persevering. The base and the roof they went well because we took are time and concentrating on are goals. We changed our ratio because when we first made it, it was to small because we had all ready made our pillars and they didn’t fit the scale.

Our Parthenon

Posted in Design Technology, History, Maths

Building our Parthenon was a long process. We faced many challenges along the way. Here is how it went:

1. We started off by researching the dimensions of the Parthenon to scale down to our Parthenon.

2. Then we started building the base for our Parthenon.

3. We started making the pillars. Here is what we had so far.

4.We made a net out of paper for our roof. We made it small so we could copy it but make it bigger. The net was made by Coolhusky.

5. We started making and putting on the pillars. Mistake number one: too much tape.

6. We finished off the pillars. Now for the roof!

In the end, we found out it was too small!!

We started again and made it perfect.

We worked well as a team. The roof went well. We would change our accuracy. Our calculations were correct but we halfed it too many times. 

 

The Parthenon challenge results!!

Posted in Art, Design Technology, History

Stage one

First of all, we needed to make a base for the building. We used newspaper to make the base stronger on the outsides. And that didn’t have any bad effects. 

 

Stage two

After we had made the base, we started making the columns. The columns held up the roof (Which we hadn’t started yet). It worked really well because we worked as a team and got them done quickly.

Stage three

The roof had to be the same size as the base; which according to our calculations were 69.5 cm by 30.9 cm. In real life, they were 69.5 M by 30.9 M. Our calculations were accurate. 

To make the roof we got some newspaper and stuck some scrunched up newspaper on top of it. This was successful and there were no problems.

Stage four

We made more columns. We made a prototype column out of card and made the columns that way for a bit. But after a while the prototype turned into an oval shape. So we made them how we did before.

Stage five

This is where the problems started. We used tape to secure the columns, and that worked, but it pulled them closer together. We worked out the distance between each column whilst planning. To solve the problem we detached the tape a bit. That seemed to work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage six

We finished making the roof. The main challenge for this, even though it sounds a bit silly, was finding a piece of paper strong enough and big enough. The rest was simple, easy and fun. After we finished the roof, we had to secure the columns a bit more so it could hold the roof. It worked. 

This was the final outcome!

If you had to do it again but change something, what would you change? 

If we did it again and had to change something, we probably would’ve changed the way we made the columns and the roof. The roof was difficult to make, but successful. We probably wouldn’t have done the roof so complicated, even though it worked really well. We probably should’ve made multiple prototypes for the columns so they would all be the same shape and size.

What went well?

Everything really. It was all very good and successful.

Were your calculations accurate?

Yes they were all correct.

 

Parthenon facts:

  • It was built over 2,460 years ago!
  • It cost the equivalent of 469 warships to build the Parthenon!
  • The Parthenon is dedicated to the goddess Athena.
  • The Parthenon  replaced an older temple.
  • About 7.2 million people visit the Parthenon each year.
  • The Parthenon has been a temple, church and mosque.
  • The Parthenon was blown up!
  • Construction started in 447 BC and ended 438 BC.

Parthenon

Posted in Art, Design Technology, History, Maths

 




When building our own version of the Parthenon we had to do a lot of research to find the calculations and structure of it. We think we worked well as a group because “when we worked together the job got done quicker,” Said spacedude.” We changed the amount of pillars around the edge too 7 by 12 instead of our original 8 by 17 due to our calculations of our bace were wrong,” said chocolatestars47. “If we did it again we would change the structure of it to make it stronger,” said iceangle614. Over alll  
together we think that our version of the Parthenon turned out well but next time we will try to improve the visual image and its strength.

 

 

Parthenon Challenge

Posted in Art, Design Technology, History

The challenge

In groups, your challenge is to design and build scale models of The Parthenon based upon the original measurements.

Getting started

If the Parthenon was 100 metres long, you wouldn’t have space to build it the actual size inside or outside the classroom so you will need to use your excellent mathematical skills to decide upon a scale. Using the example of 100m, you could say that one metre in real life would represent 1cm on your scale model.

Remember that you need to convert the units of measurement first, how many cm in a m?

How many cm is 100m? 1cm on your model would represent how many cm in real life?  What would the scale look like from my example?

1: 100       1: 1000          1:10             1:10,000           1: 100, 000          1: 1,000,000

It’s this man’s job to work for Lego to make scale models. Click on the link to find out more:

Scaling up or down BBC Bitesize KS2 maths

Would you like to work for Lego making scale models?

Researching

Remembering what we have learnt about internet research and research from books, find out about The Parthenon and  why it was so important to Ancient Greek people.

Where is it? Who went there? Do people still go there now?

You may use any books in the classroom and library freely. You may use Swiggle for information freely however if you would like to use the Internet for anything else you will need to run it past me first so that I can check to see if it is safe.

Designing and making

Now that you know, the measurements and some basic information about the Parthenon, have a go at making a scaled model.

Sharing your model with the World!

When you have finished, in your groups create a blog post about The Parthenon with information and a photograph of your finished model. You could also add photographs of the process and explain why you chose to make it as you did. Remember not to add photographs of yourself alongside your usernames-I will be taking lots of photographs so that you can focus on the process.  Mistakes are for learning so include any problems you came across and how you overcame them in your evaluation at the end of the session.

Have fun!